CHRISTIANSFELD

PROJECT
Christiansfeld
DEVELOPER
Kolding Kommune
WHERE AND WHEN
Christiansfeld, 2012
MILFORD PRODUCTS/SYSTEMS
StrataCells

RENEWAL OF THE CITY'S OLD LINDEN TREES
In 2015, Christiansfeld was added to UNESCO’s special world cultural heritage list. Christiansfeld is considered to be one of the most beautiful Moravian cities in Europe because so much of the original town is so well preserved. The buildings stand today largely as they did when the city was founded in 1773. Christiansfeld, between Kolding and Haderslev, is one of Denmark’s most distinctive cities. But the city’s ancient trees were not doing so well, andin 2013 a major restoration project was kicked off. The historic linden trees from the 1700s were affected by rotting, and all of them had to be replaced. 14 new linden trees on Museum Street and another 52 trees on Nørregade, an extension of Museum Street, were planted as part of a master plan to restore the old city centre while also bringing it into the modern age. Renovation of buildings and new road surfacing was part of the project as well.

THE TREES PRESERVE THE CITY CENTRE’S ORIGINAL APPEARANCE
Thomas Thinghuus, landscape architect at Kolding Municipality, explains: “We took a look at old drawings in order to discover what the city centre looked like originally. We then came up with the best possible solution to restore Christiansfeld while ensuring accessibility for all.” . In the next stage, an additional 74 trees were planted on Linden S for a total of 140 trees – all planted in StrataCells supplied by Milford.

THE SOIL CELL SYSTEM MADE IT SIMPLE AND EASY
Landscape architect Kjeld Larsen & Søn A/S was responsible for the planting; it was their introduction to the soil cell system. “It was like working with LEGO bricks. They were easy to snap together and weighed nothing. The cells ensure that the tree will be able to establish a large root system,” explains Tove Andersen, installation technician at Kjeld Larsen & Søn A/S. Each tree is surrounded by 64 earth cells in two layers. The cells are filled with loam, and the tree’s root system can then find itsway through the individual cells. “When all the cells are placed around a tree, you get an enclosure that can support the surface and the weight of traffic without affecting the root.”